Evidence That Legal Reforms Which Reduce Malpractice Risk Decrease Defensive Medicine

Malpractice reforms are linked to lowered use of invasive coronary angiography

One of the first studies to investigate how medical malpractice reforms such as damage caps affect specific clinical decisions provides strong evidence that caps have inspired physicians to reduce utilizing an expensive and invasive cardiology test.

How Pay for Success May Work with Medicaid to Promote Public Health

New research provides insights into how the innovative “Pay for Success” (PFS) financing model could be used in interventions aimed at Medicaid populations. The analysis, one of the first investigations into the potential of PFS for Medicaid recipients, suggests that the approach could help fund the implementation of evidence-based childhood asthma interventions that help avoid emergency department visits—if legal and regulatory barriers can be overcome.

Blog: The New District of Columbia Policy to Protect Insurance Coverage

The District of Columbia recently took an important step to protect health insurance coverage by creating a District-specific health insurance requirement.  This is in response to the unexpected termination of the federal health insurance requirement, which Congress narrowly passed last December.  The Affordable Care Act had required that federal taxpayers, except some with low incomes, to have health insurance or pay a federal income tax penalty.  The underlying logic was that this would incentivize more people to get coverage and prevent insurance premiums from rising for the great majori

New Data on the Cost-shifting Debate Published in the National Bureau of Economic Research

New research published by the nonprofit, nonpartisan National Bureau of Economic Research provides new data on a longstanding debate in health economics and health policy:  whether or not hospitals “cost-shift” by adjusting prices with private insurers following reductions in public funding.  The new analysis shows that between 2010 and 2015, hospitals reacted to reduced Medicare payments by negotiating 1.6 percent average higher payments from private insurers,  increased prices that added an average of $86,500 per hospital for acute care claims for privately insured patients to offset reim