Evidence That Legal Reforms Which Reduce Malpractice Risk Decrease Defensive Medicine

Malpractice reforms are linked to lowered use of invasive coronary angiography

One of the first studies to investigate how medical malpractice reforms such as damage caps affect specific clinical decisions provides strong evidence that caps have inspired physicians to reduce utilizing an expensive and invasive cardiology test.

Speaking for the Record: The Public Health Implications of Medicaid Work Experiments

In June, a federal district court ruled in Stewart v Azar that the HHS Secretary acted unlawfully in approving Kentucky’s Medicaid work demonstration, because he never even considered the issue that lies at the heart of any federally-sanctioned experiment carried our pursuant to § 1115 of the Social Security Act – how the demonstration will promote the objectives of the program that is the subject of the experiment.  In Medicaid’s case, that objective is to give people medical assistance – the means by

GW Faculty and Staff Submit Comments to HHS on Proposed Title X “Gag” Rule

A group of 17 members of the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health’s (GW Milken Institute SPH) faculty and staff submitted comments on July 26 in response to a recent rule proposed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The GW Milken Institute SPH group said they are “deeply concerned about any proposed changes to Title X policies that could adversely impact health center participation, given Title X’s major role in strengthening and enhancing health centers’ family planning performance.”

Investigation into State-level Changes in Use of Long-acting Reversible Contraception Shows Differences Persist

The growing use of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) in the federal Title X family planning programs suggests more low-income women who want to avoid pregnancy are able to access one of the most effective forms of contraception. However, increases in LARC use by Title X family planning clients aren’t distributed evenly across states, a team from East Tennessee State University found.

Investigation into How State Laws Affect What Hospitals Allow Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants to Do

nurse practitioners and physician assistants in action

New research that seeks to understand how hospital policies dictate what nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) are allowed to do reveals that there is enormous variations across hospitals, and that, contrary to what might be expected, this variation is not associated with state scope of practice laws for either profession.