Number of U.S. Alcohol-exposed Pregnancies and Births May Be Substantially Lower Than Previously Estimated

Pregnant woman wrestling with whether to take a drink

Approximately 731,000 women in the U.S. are at risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancies each month, according to a new estimate published by researchers at the University of California at San Francisco. Although this number still indicates cause for concern, the new estimate is much lower than the estimate of 3.3 million released in 2016 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Investigating How Cases Where State Laws Preempt Local Tobacco Laws Impact Adolescent Health

teen boys smoking

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at the end of last year 32 U.S. states had laws that preempted more stringent control of tobacco at the local level. A researcher at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health has received a $150,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Policy for Action program to study the impacts of those preemption laws on adolescent health and health disparities.

Systemic Supports Needed to Reinforce Opioid Legislation

The opioid legislation that President Trump is soon expected to sign into law has been widely hailed as a bipartisan success and a step forward for public health. But more needs to be done to ensure that the supports needed to improve people's health overall are in place, says Naomi Seiler, JD of the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health.

Policies that Help Medicaid Beneficiaries to Quit Smoking

At a time when American adults living below the poverty line are over 50 percent more likely to smoke than other citizens, health care services provided through Medicaid may make a real difference.  A new paper by researchers from the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health (Milken Institute SPH) analyzed state Medicaid coverage policies to see which ones were most effective.

To Counter Pain and Opioid Use in Women, Commentary Recommends a Physical Activity Research Agenda

In a new commentary in the journal Women’s Health Issues, a group of researchers notes that as many as one-third of U.S. and Canadian women suffer from chronic pain, and commonly prescribed opioid treatments come with substantial risks. National health agencies recommend physical activity as a nonpharmacologic pain management strategy, but health professionals don’t yet have enough information about the type and intensity of exercise to recommend for specific groups of patients, or how best to make physical activity accessible to those who could use it to manage chronic pain.