Newly Released Census Figures Show Nearly 500,000 More Uninsured

New data released by the U.S. Census Bureau show that 28.5 million people did not have health insurance in 2017.

Speaking for the Record: The Public Health Implications of Medicaid Work Experiments

Sara Rosenbaum explains why she and 42 other health experts submitted an amicus brief in support of the lawsuit brought by a group of Medicaid enrollees challenging the Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary’s approval of the Kentucky Medicaid work requirement.

Making a Case for the Individual Mandate in Washington, D.C.

George Washington University Professor Leighton Ku is a member of the executive board of Washington, D.C.’s Health Benefit Exchange Authority.

How Pay for Success May Work with Medicaid to Promote Public Health

New research provides insights into how the innovative “Pay for Success” (PFS) financing model could be used in interventions aimed at Medicaid populations. The analysis, one of the first investigations into the potential of PFS for Medicaid recipients, suggests that the approach could help fund the implementation of evidence-based childhood asthma interventions that help avoid emergency department visits—if legal and regulatory barriers can be overcome.

Blog: The New District of Columbia Policy to Protect Insurance Coverage

The District of Columbia recently took an important step to protect health insurance coverage by creating a District-specific health insurance requirement.  This is in response to the unexpected termination of the federal health insurance requirement, which Congress narrowly passed last December.  The Affordable Care Act had required that federal taxpayers, except some with low incomes, to have health insurance or pay a federal income tax penalty.  The underlying logic was that this would incentivize more people to get coverage and prevent insurance premiums from rising for the great majori