How Pay for Success May Work with Medicaid to Promote Public Health

New research provides insights into how the innovative “Pay for Success” (PFS) financing model could be used in interventions aimed at Medicaid populations. The analysis, one of the first investigations into the potential of PFS for Medicaid recipients, suggests that the approach could help fund the implementation of evidence-based childhood asthma interventions that help avoid emergency department visits—if legal and regulatory barriers can be overcome.

Blog: The New District of Columbia Policy to Protect Insurance Coverage

The District of Columbia recently took an important step to protect health insurance coverage by creating a District-specific health insurance requirement.  This is in response to the unexpected termination of the federal health insurance requirement, which Congress narrowly passed last December.  The Affordable Care Act had required that federal taxpayers, except some with low incomes, to have health insurance or pay a federal income tax penalty.  The underlying logic was that this would incentivize more people to get coverage and prevent insurance premiums from rising for the great majori

Data About Contraceptive Needs in the U.S. After the Affordable Care Act

In February 2016, the American Journal of Public Health published an article about contraceptive needs and costs in the United States after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act coauthored by George Washington University’s Leighton Ku and Erika Steinmetz.

Blog: Public Health Scholars Respond to a New Effort to Repeal the Affordable Care Act

Last December’s tax law eliminated the tax penalty associated with the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA’s) individual shared responsibility penalty (or individual mandate).  Although the mandate still exists in the ACA, the financial penalty associated with not purchasing affordable insurance has been eliminated.

Policies that Help Medicaid Beneficiaries to Quit Smoking

At a time when American adults living below the poverty line are over 50 percent more likely to smoke than other citizens, health care services provided through Medicaid may make a real difference.  A new paper by researchers from the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health (Milken Institute SPH) analyzed state Medicaid coverage policies to see which ones were most effective.