GW Milken Institute School of Public Health Researchers Comment on Virginia’s Proposed Medicaid Work Experiment

The comments describe what the Milken Institute SPH researchers perceive to be the fundamental flaws with this (or any other) mandatory Medicaid work demonstration.

Systemic Supports Needed to Reinforce Opioid Legislation

The opioid legislation that President Trump is soon expected to sign into law has been widely hailed as a bipartisan success and a step forward for public health. But more needs to be done to ensure that the supports needed to improve people's health overall are in place, says Naomi Seiler, JD of the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health.

Speaking for the Record: The Public Health Implications of Medicaid Work Experiments

Sara Rosenbaum explains why she and 42 other health experts submitted an amicus brief in support of the lawsuit brought by a group of Medicaid enrollees challenging the Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary’s approval of the Kentucky Medicaid work requirement.

GW Faculty and Staff Submit Comments to HHS on Proposed Title X “Gag” Rule

A group of 17 members of the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health’s (GW Milken Institute SPH) faculty and staff submitted comments on July 26 in response to a recent rule proposed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The GW Milken Institute SPH group said they are “deeply concerned about any proposed changes to Title X policies that could adversely impact health center participation, given Title X’s major role in strengthening and enhancing health centers’ family planning performance.”

How Policy Gaps Fail People Who Inject Drugs and Contract Endocarditis

surgeons operating

Recent media reports suggest that healthcare providers around the country are grappling with how to respond to rising rates of endocarditis, a life-threatening infection caused by bacteria that enter the bloodstream and settle in the heart, linked to people who inject drugs. Reports in the New York Times and NPR describe the dilemma faced by physicians called on to perform repeat costly heart surgeries on patients who were re-infected with endocarditis as a result of ongoing illicit drug use.