Safeguarding Patient Data is a Key Component of Patient Care

The healthcare sector of the economy has traditionally lagged behind other sectors in terms of technology use and the infrastructure it requires.  Unwanted publicity over cyber-attacks and data breaches are causing healthcare businesses to finally wake up to the reality that their data are extraordinarily sensitive.  Data breaches and leaks can happen in many industries, but healthcare data breaches and associated abuse can have catastrophic consequences on people’s lives.

Ending Healthcare Payments: Bursting the Balloon or Just Squeezing It?

President Trump has threatened to cancel federal health insurance payments called “cost-sharing reductions.”  He hopes this collapses the Affordable Care Act’s health insurance exchanges, creating leverage for further repeal negotiations with recalcitrant Senators and Congressmen.  However, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) reported that ending these payments would actually increase federal costs by $194 billion over ten years and cause a million people to lose health insurance next year.

Inoculating Healthcare Businesses with Enterprise Resilience

At a time when the nationwide debate over Health Reform has no clear endpoint, executives in the health related sectors should take a pragmatic approach and guide their organizations to prepare and plan for change.  While uncertainty is at an all-time high, providers, insurers and pharma/biotech businesses should embrace a posture of resilience.  For example, the Enterprise Resilience model enables business in different sectors to prepare, plan and align their efforts to address the implications of various scenarios related to health reform.  It is a defensive posture in which they must und

Why Embracing Resilience Will Help Whatever Happens Next in the Repeal/Replace Debate

So the Senate Republicans failed to pass legislation that would repeal and replace Obamacare.  What now?  Even if the House and Senate take a break from their efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, the administration still has power to strengthen or weaken the law. The words “The Secretary shall” appear more than 1,400 times in the ACA (according to sources), thus giving the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services significant authority over the functioning of the law.