Data on Veterans’ Use of Complementary Health Therapies

participants in a yoga class

A new study published in Women’s Health Issues reports the results of an analysis of the use of complementary health therapies by 468,806 U.S. veterans with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

Report Documents Importance of Community Health Centers for Underserved Communities

A new report documents the increasingly visible role that community health centers are playing in the maturing, post-Affordable Care Act (ACA) health care market. Issued by the Geiger Gibson/RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Collaborative at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, the report was published in partnership with the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Evidence That Legal Reforms Which Reduce Malpractice Risk Decrease Defensive Medicine

Malpractice reforms are linked to lowered use of invasive coronary angiography

One of the first studies to investigate how medical malpractice reforms such as damage caps affect specific clinical decisions provides strong evidence that caps have inspired physicians to reduce utilizing an expensive and invasive cardiology test.

Investigation into State-level Changes in Use of Long-acting Reversible Contraception Shows Differences Persist

The growing use of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) in the federal Title X family planning programs suggests more low-income women who want to avoid pregnancy are able to access one of the most effective forms of contraception. However, increases in LARC use by Title X family planning clients aren’t distributed evenly across states, a team from East Tennessee State University found.

Women with Greater Heart-Disease Risk Less Likely to Get Recommended Preventive Care, Finds Study of Commercial Health Plan Members

After studies drew attention to gender disparities in cardiovascular care, many health insurers and provider groups adopted population health management tools, which identify at-risk plan members and direct additional attention or resources toward their care. In a new study, researchers used data from a large commercial health plan to investigate whether gender disparities persist – and they found that women with diabetes and coronary artery disease are less likely to have appropriate cholesterol control than their male peers are.