How Community Characteristics Can Impact Blood Pressure Levels

A study led by Health Policy and Management Professor and Chair Thomas LaVeist evaluated associations between community characteristics and blood pressure levels and prevalent hypertension in a racially integrated community. The Exploring Health Disparities in Integrated Communities Study measured blood pressure in residents of two contiguous racially integrated and low-income U.S. Census Tracts.

LaVeist and Other Experts Argue for How to Achieve Health Equity by Design

Health Policy and Management Professor and Chair Thomas LaVeist is one of three nationally known experts who authored a Viewpoint in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) on how to achieve health equity by design.  

Narrowing Down the Role Played by Ethnicity in Obesity Among Hispanic Men

A study led by Health Policy and Management Professor and Chair Thomas LaVeist made an important contribution by parsing out more details about the racial and ethnic identities of Hispanic men, who tend to have the highest prevalence of obesity compared with non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black men.  In an article published in the American Journal of Men’s Health, LaVeist’s team examined the relationship between race/ethnicity, obesity, and nativity in data from 11 years (2002-2012) of the National Health Interview Survey.

Lancet Perspective on Health Policy and Management Chair LaVeist’s Early Life and Influences

The epiphany moment that led to Health Policy and Management Professor and Chair Thomas LaVeist’s recognition that “that sociological phenomena could actually be predictive of death” is chronicled in this Lancet perspective.

Report on the Economic Burden of Health Inequalities in the United States

Health Policy and Management Chair and Professor Thomas LaVeist is the first author of a report commissioned by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, a non-partisan, non-profit public policy organization that supports elected officials and policy experts who serve communities of color across the country.   The Economic Burden of Health Inequalities in the United States is widely cited.