Data on Veterans’ Use of Complementary Health Therapies

participants in a yoga class

A new study published in Women’s Health Issues reports the results of an analysis of the use of complementary health therapies by 468,806 U.S. veterans with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

Report Documents Importance of Community Health Centers for Underserved Communities

A new report documents the increasingly visible role that community health centers are playing in the maturing, post-Affordable Care Act (ACA) health care market. Issued by the Geiger Gibson/RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Collaborative at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, the report was published in partnership with the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Evidence That Legal Reforms Which Reduce Malpractice Risk Decrease Defensive Medicine

Malpractice reforms are linked to lowered use of invasive coronary angiography

One of the first studies to investigate how medical malpractice reforms such as damage caps affect specific clinical decisions provides strong evidence that caps have inspired physicians to reduce utilizing an expensive and invasive cardiology test.

How Pay for Success May Work with Medicaid to Promote Public Health

New research provides insights into how the innovative “Pay for Success” (PFS) financing model could be used in interventions aimed at Medicaid populations. The analysis, one of the first investigations into the potential of PFS for Medicaid recipients, suggests that the approach could help fund the implementation of evidence-based childhood asthma interventions that help avoid emergency department visits—if legal and regulatory barriers can be overcome.

Investigation into How State Laws Affect What Hospitals Allow Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants to Do

nurse practitioners and physician assistants in action

New research that seeks to understand how hospital policies dictate what nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) are allowed to do reveals that there is enormous variations across hospitals, and that, contrary to what might be expected, this variation is not associated with state scope of practice laws for either profession.