Commentary Calls for Better Diagnosis and Treatment of Perinatal Depression in Latinas and African American Women

In a new commentary in the journal Women’s Health Issues, authors call for more funding to improve diagnosis and treatment of perinatal depression in Latinas and African American women. “Increasing Diagnosis and Treatment of Perinatal Depression in Latinas and African American Women: Addressing Stigma Is Not Enough” notes that rates of diagnosis and treatment for depression during pregnancy and after childbirth are low in Latinas and African American women. 

Older Adult Falls Are Costly But Not Inevitable, According to a Health Affairs Blog by GW Researchers

Each year, an estimated 29 million adults aged 65 and older fall, and a recent study by researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that in 2015 alone older adults’ falls cost $50 billion.  In a recent blog in Health Affairs, GW researchers offer policy and practice recommendations for scaling up utilization of falls prevention interventions and risk assessments.

Blog: New Skills for Chief Information Officers at Health Care Organizations

In recent years, the job description of a chief information officer (CIO) at a healthcare organization has evolved and moved well beyond technical desktop support and systems implementation.  We are now in an era when CIOs are expected to be consistently innovative. They must always stay abreast of the latest changes in information technology and knowledge, and leverage into innovative solutions for their enterprise. 

Health Centers in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands Face Serious Threats as the Next Hurricane Season Approaches

Six months after Hurricanes Irma and Maria pummeled Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI), the regions’ twenty-three community health centers continue to play a crucial role in responding to the catastrophe, providing direct care and essential community-based public health services.

Providing Legal Services in Clinical Settings Can Help Promote Health Equity, According to New Research in Health Affairs

As health care organizations seek to address unmet social needs of their patients to improve health care quality, equity, and health outcomes, medical-legal partnership offers a practical intervention to address social and environmental circumstances of patients that have a remedy in civil law. More than 300 health care organizations nationwide have adopted medical-legal partnerships in a wide variety of settings, including general hospitals and health systems, children’s hospitals, health centers, veteran’s health clinics, tribal health organizations, and others.