Evidence That Legal Reforms Which Reduce Malpractice Risk Decrease Defensive Medicine

Malpractice reforms are linked to lowered use of invasive coronary angiography

One of the first studies to investigate how medical malpractice reforms such as damage caps affect specific clinical decisions provides strong evidence that caps have inspired physicians to reduce utilizing an expensive and invasive cardiology test.

How Pay for Success May Work with Medicaid to Promote Public Health

New research provides insights into how the innovative “Pay for Success” (PFS) financing model could be used in interventions aimed at Medicaid populations. The analysis, one of the first investigations into the potential of PFS for Medicaid recipients, suggests that the approach could help fund the implementation of evidence-based childhood asthma interventions that help avoid emergency department visits—if legal and regulatory barriers can be overcome.

Investigation into How State Laws Affect What Hospitals Allow Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants to Do

nurse practitioners and physician assistants in action

New research that seeks to understand how hospital policies dictate what nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) are allowed to do reveals that there is enormous variations across hospitals, and that, contrary to what might be expected, this variation is not associated with state scope of practice laws for either profession. 

Data About Contraceptive Needs in the U.S. After the Affordable Care Act

In February 2016, the American Journal of Public Health published an article about contraceptive needs and costs in the United States after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act coauthored by George Washington University’s Leighton Ku and Erika Steinmetz.

Implications of Rising Numbers of Nurse Practitioners

A new blog in Health Affairs analyzes recent data from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) on the pipeline of new nurse practitioners (NPs) and registered nurses (RNs). It presents the implications for the health care system, nursing and physician education, and federal and state policies.