Low-income Adults in Medicaid Expansion States Report Better Access to Health Care, GAO Report Finds

A new report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) adds to the growing evidence that some states' failure to expand Medicaid is leaving low income adults with unmet health needs. Based on U.S. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data, the report focuses on access to care for low-income adults in states that have and have not expanded access to Medicaid.

Sara Rosenbaum Analyzes Impacts of New “Public Charge” Rule on Immigrants with Medicaid

Professor Sara Rosenbaum The new analysis explains why the proposed "public charge" rule published last week by the Trump administration could affect millions of legal immigrants enrolled in Medicaid and would have a dramatic impact on the overall stability of the health care system.

Sara Rosenbaum Shares Her Opinions on the Myths We Tell Ourselves About the Poor

The Expanding Work Requirements in Non-Cash Welfare Programs report released by the President’s Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) in July was one of the inspirations for a new opinion piece by Sara Rosenbaum, JD, the Harold and Jane Hirsh Professor of Health Law at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health. Published in the Milbank Quarterly, her piece traces the deep roots of the American myth about the working poor to the 1601 English Poor Law.

GAO Report Details How State Medicaid Programs Cover Home and Community-based Care

As the U.S. population ages, the number of people needing long-term support services (LTSS) to help with routine daily activities has been growing and is expected to continue to increase. All state Medicaid programs finance coverage of LTSS. A new report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office looks at how five states’ Medicaid programs are choosing to fund services to help beneficiaries with physical, cognitive, or other limitations to perform activities such as eating, dressing, and making meals in their homes or other community settings.

State Policies Linked to Uptake of HPV Vaccine

State policies play a significant role in the usage of vaccinations to prevent human papilloma virus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S.  Wayne Psek, MD, PhD, of the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health served as an author on a study that identified a combination of state policies that are associated with high uptake of the vaccine in children, which the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends beginning when they are 11 or 12 years old.